Review – The Price of Privilege: How parental pressure and material advantage are creating a generation of disconnected and unhappy kids. New York: Harper. 2008.

Diamond Sharp

book cover price of privilegeMadeline Levine’s book The Price of Privilege gives the non-professional a good overview of the problems besetting affluent teens with some compassionate and practical alternatives to their current predicament.

It is tempting to dismiss the psychological ill-health that seems to be hitting adolescents from privileged homes. Like the issues dealt with inOverwhelmed, it would be easy to disregard the problems explored here as just the sort of thing that wealthy people inflict on themselves. However, Levine’s book persuades us that we should take these problems seriously. Her argument is that teens are teens, after all, no matter what their background, and need mentoring into adulthood from trusted adults. What’s more, these teens in particular, are more likely to become the surgeons, politicians, entrepreneurs, lawyers, and leaders of the future. So, we want them to be resilient, moral, compassionate, stable, and capable of making positive contributions to their community…

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1 thought on “Review – The Price of Privilege: How parental pressure and material advantage are creating a generation of disconnected and unhappy kids. New York: Harper. 2008.”

  1. Dear Ms Sharp,

    I was just wondering; how do you personally treat the more ‘introverted’ kids in the classroom? This has been a problem for me, as I never particularly liked the teachers who ‘picked’ or ‘victimised’ the quieter kids, which in turn just makes them feel even less confident, and becomes obvious to these students.
    However as a teacher, I still believe it’s important to get students to express themselves.
    So how do you address this problem and treat the ‘quieter’ ones?

    Anna

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